HOW WE WORK


Liutertec avails itself of the most recently adapted technological equipment for the analysis and completion
of a condition report; which include:

Visible images

We observe, in high resolution, the external surface of the instrument.

3D Scanning

We reconstruct a digital three dimensional model of the instrument to determine its
dimensions without having to physically touch it.

Ultraviolet imaging

We analyse the original layers of varnish, to check for elements of weakening and wearand tear.

Infrared imaging:

We analyse the surface underneath the top coat of varnish, as well as the preparation and subsequent degeneration of the wood.

Infrared false color imaging

We investigate the effects on the instrument of previous restoration works through the uncovering of the various coats of polish and other elements that are no longer visible.

X-Ray imaging

We study the general construction of the instrument from a structural perspective.

Dendrochronological Analysis

We are able to determine that actual date the tree used to make the
instrument was knocked down. We compare the growth rates of the wood used for the instrument with those of other trees of the same species, which in turn allows us go back in time to discover who the artisan was that used that same wood.

Spectroscopic analysis

We reveal the various components found in the varnish and the wood itself, which are fundamental in both stopping the process of degeneration as well as in bringing the instrument back to
its original conditional

Thermographic Analysis

We measure the reaction speed of the various materials used to make the
instrument to variations in temperature.

Endoscopic Analysis

We scrutinise the internal structure to better understand the degenerative process of the wood, as well as performing analysis on the bow itself if made of an organic material and the impact of any previous restoration works

Liutertec avails itself of the most recently adapted technological equipment for the analysis and completion
of a condition report; which include:

Visible images

We observe, in high resolution, the external surface of the instrument.


3D Scanning

We reconstruct a digital three dimensional model of the instrument to determine its
dimensions without having to physically touch it.


Ultraviolet imaging

We analyse the original layers of varnish, to check for elements of weakening and wearand tear.


Infrared imaging:

We analyse the surface underneath the top coat of varnish, as well as the preparation and subsequent degeneration of the wood.


Infrared false color imaging

We investigate the effects on the instrument of previous restoration works through the uncovering of the various coats of polish and other elements that are no longer visible.


X-Ray imaging

We study the general construction of the instrument from a structural perspective.


Dendrochronological Analysis

We are able to determine that actual date the tree used to make the
instrument was knocked down. We compare the growth rates of the wood used for the instrument with those of other trees of the same species, which in turn allows us go back in time to discover who the artisan was that used that same wood.


Spectroscopic analysis

We reveal the various components found in the varnish and the wood itself, which are fundamental in both stopping the process of degeneration as well as in bringing the instrument back to
its original conditional


Thermographic Analysis

We measure the reaction speed of the various materials used to make the
instrument to variations in temperature.


Endoscopic Analysis

We scrutinise the internal structure to better understand the degenerative process of the wood, as well as performing analysis on the bow itself if made of an organic material and the impact of any previous restoration works